CLISEC news

  • 2nd CLISEC-PIK workshop 2018

    2nd CLISEC-PIK workshop focussing on "Qualitative and Quantitative Methods for Advancing Research on the Climate-Migration-Conflict Nexus" was conducted in Potsdam on 23 May 2018 from 11 am - 5 pm.

  • Hossein Azadi was invited to ELSEDIMA 2018 as a keynote speaker

    Hossein Azadi was invited to the 12th International Conference on Environmental Legislation, Safety Engineering and Disaster Management (ELSEDIMA 2018) on 17-19 May 2018 in Cluj-Napoca, Romania as a keynote speaker. He gave a talk on "Agricultural Land Conversion: Reviewing Drought Impacts and Coping Strategies".

  • Jürgen Scheffran presented a paper in San Francisco

    Jürgen Scheffran presented a paper titled "Beyond Richardson: Modeling conflict in a world of complexity and climate change" at the panel on Lewis F Richardson, International Studies Association (ISA) Annual Convention, April 4-7, 2018, San Francisco.

  • Christiane Fröhlich receives Postdoc at GIGA

    Christiane Fröhlich is starting a new position at GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies in January 2018. Her research will continue to focus on human mobility, particularly on forced migration, with a regional focus on the Southern Mediterranean, esp. Syria, Turkey and Israel/Palestine. More information is available here.

    Photo:

  • Workshop Climate Change, Decarbonization and the Urban Energy Transition

    Workshop "Climate Change, Decarbonization and the Urban Energy Transition"

    Universität Hamburg, Germany, October 12-13, 2017

    Jürgen Scheffran (CLISEC) and Jürgen Oßenbrügge (both CliSAP and Institute of Geography) are co-organizers of this event which is supported by the CliSAP Cluster of Excellence. The program of the workshop is available here; further details can be found here.

  • Workshop "Anthropocene Mobilities"

    International workshop organised by Christiane Fröhlich and Delf Rothe, June 1-2, 2017.

    Workshop Abstract: Geologists and Earth System scientists have argued that the planet has entered a new epoch: the Anthropocene. The Anthropocene names the age in which humanity took control over the planet and pushed the Earth System into a new stage of disequilibrium, with significant effects on global human - and non-human - mobility. The workshop draws on this new perspective on planetary change provided by the Anthropocene debate to further the debate on environmental or climate-induced migration and its policy implications.

    The Anthropocene's implications for the study of environmental migration as well as for international security have so far seldom been considered in academic literature, even though it forces us to re-evaluate and re-think our fundamental ontological and epistemological concepts (Gemenne 2015). As argued by Bruno Latour and others, the advent of the Anthropocene implies the end of “’the bifurcation of nature’ or the final rejection of the separation between Nature and Humanity that has paralyzed science and politics since the dawn of modernism” (Latour 2015).

    The described “bifurcation of nature” also characterizes the existing literature on environmentally or climate-induced migration. In the earlier literature on environmental migration, often accused of a naive environmental determinism, nature appeared in the form of disasters and extreme events, which tipped societies into chaos and pushed people out of their homes (Myers, 1991, 1998, 2005; Myers et al. 1995; Brown 2008; Waever, Buzan, Kelstrup, & Lemaitre, 1993). But even though the literature on environmental migration has become much more sophisticated and the environmental determinism of the old days has been replaced by sensitivity for the multi-causality of migratory decisions (Castles 2002, Morrissey 2009), the social and the natural are still artificially divided into a set of variables, just to be recombined and layered in computer models or regression analyses (Selby 2014).

    The workshop seeks to fundamentally rethink the prevailing ontological categories of environmental migration research and to work towards an analytical framework which studies processes of human mobility within their specific, hybrid socio-natural contexts. It seeks to initiate a fruitful dialogue between scholars working on climate change and human mobility, on the one hand, and scholars engaging with the Anthropocene concept and its theoretical and normative implications on the other.

    A program is available here.

  • Hande Paker joins CLISEC

    as a visiting scientist. She is a political sociologist who works on civil society, state, the transformation of citizenship, and political ecology. She has carried out research and published on modes of civil society-state relations, politics of the environment at the local-global nexus, and grounded cosmopolitan citizenship, with a particular focus on environmental struggles and women’s rights. Her articles have appeared in Environmental Politics, Theory and Society, and Middle Eastern Studies. Her current research project focuses on how environmental civil society actors engage the issue of climate change to mobilize publics by focusing on local and transnational environmental spaces of action in Turkey and Germany. More information is available here.

    Photo: hande paker

  • Workshop "Beyond Climate Migration"

    International workshop organised by Sarah Nash, Christiane Fröhlich (both CLISEC) and Ethemcan Turhan, April 20-21.

    Workshop abstract: Since the mid-2000s, a lively scholarship has emerged that links climate change with human mobility. Several points of consensus have emerged: That climate change and human mobility are related concepts, as climate change will have impacts on human mobility; that these relations are complex and mobility decisions will be multi-causal; that mobilities will be different, with people being affected differently. Nevertheless, ‘climate migration’ has become a field of research and policymaking alike. Frequently, complexities and interrelations are glossed over in contributions that continue to strengthen ‘climate migration’ as a concrete phenomenon.

    The workshop ‘Beyond Climate Migration’ moved beyond ‘climate migration’ to critically engage with migration in a world increasingly more complex with multiple geopolitical and environmental challenges. The main goal of the workshop was to critically evaluate and engage with current practices in the field of ‘climate migration’ and with different constructions of space, as well as to develop a better understanding of intersectional differences and the social regulation of borders for people on the move. We also provided an interdisciplinary platform in which researchers and migration/development practitioners could exchange ideas not solely focusing on climate change-migration relations but on the broader phenomena of human mobility under major environmental and geopolitical transformations.

    A video on the workshop is available here.

  • Workshop on Agent-based Modeling

    1st Hamburg Workshop on Agent-based Modeling of Environmental Challenges and Climate Policy jointly organized by CLISEC and the Research Unit Sustainability and Global Change (FNU). Details about the workshop can be found here, the call for papers is available here.

  • Sarah Louise Nash wins best paper award at Hugo conference

    Dr. Sarah Nash has been awarded the best paper award at the Hugo Conference 2016 for her paper From Cancun to Paris: deconstructing an era of policymaking on the migration and climate change nexus. More information can be found here.

News

  1. 30.03.2017

    Science Answers to Migration and Flight

    Across the globe people are fleeing their home regions. Together with international researchers, Dr. Christiane Fröhlich from Universität Hamburg's Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) shows why flight often turns into a process spanning years. In a timely special issue of...

  2. 15.02.2016

    Jürgen Scheffran über komplexe Krisen und das Klima der Unsicherheit

    Das Jahr 2015 hat Krisen wie am Fließband sichtbar gemacht. Ukraine, Griechenland, Syrien, Irak, Afghanistan, Mali, Paris, Köln: Dies sind nur einige der Brennpunkte, an denen sich destruktive Entwicklungen entluden. Damit verbunden sind Flüchtlingskrisen und Umweltkatastrophen wie Stürme,...

  3. 30.06.2015

    CliSAP Workshop: Migration in Times of Crisis

    There are two chief causes of migration: environmental destruction and global climate change on the one hand, and political oppression and violent conflicts on the other. What human mobility looks like under these conditions was the focus of an international workshop organized by CliSAP researchers...

  4. 19.12.2014

    Genocide Conference: Climate research offers a new perspective

    Genocide researchers can no longer afford to ignore climate science, according to Prof. Jürgen Zimmerer from the Cluster of Excellence CliSAP. The historian, who was also one of the organizers of the Fourth Global Conference on Genocide in Cape Town, South Africa aims to bridge the gap between the...